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LOCATED: 818 N. EMPORIA, SUITE 305,
WICHITA, KS 67214
FAX: 316-265-1685

Breast Reconstruction Surgery

VIEW BEFORE & AFTER GALLERY

breast reconstruction surgery wichita plastic surgeon

 

Request A Breast Reconstruction Surgery Consultation Today!

To request an appointment please call our office at 316-265-1441 or fill out the information below and we will call you to set up your consultation. Dr. Peterson has preformed 1000’s of breast reconstruction procedures. There is an initial consultation fee of $80.00 that applies towards your surgical costs. We look forward to meeting you!

 

Is Breast Reconstruction Surgery Right For Me?

If you have recently been diagnosed with breast cancer or have had a mastectomy following breast cancer, Breast Reconstruction may be an option for you to consider. Breast reconstruction can be a physically and emotionally rewarding procedure for women who have lost a breast. The goal of breast reconstruction is to restore one or both breasts to near normal shape, appearance, symmetry and size following mastectomy, lumpectomy or other trauma.

Breast reconstruction often involves several procedures performed in stages and can either begin at the time of mastectomy or be delayed until a later date.  Reconstruction generally falls into two categories:  Implant reconstruction or flap reconstruction. Implant reconstruction relies on breast implants to help form a new breast mound. Flap reconstruction uses the patient’s own tissue from the abdomen to form a new breast.

Recovery time depends on the patient and the extent of the surgery. Temporary drains are inserted to remove excess drainage from the surgical sites. Surgery restrictions are in place for 4 to 6 weeks and include no lifting over 20 pounds, no jogging or contact sport activity and avoiding raising arms any higher than to fix your hair. Generally, most women return to work in three to four weeks after surgery.

 

Wichita’s Experienced & Certified Breast Reconstruction Surgeon

wichita plastic surgeon specializing in breast reconstruction

Dr. Peterson is a board-certified plastic surgeon who is recognized by The American Board of Plastic Surgery. With a long-standing practice in Wichita, KS, Dr. Peterson has the experience and credentials necessary to give you the quality care you deserve: Member of American Society of Plastic Surgeons, Member of American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Voted Best Doctors 2011-2015 by Wichita Business Journal

breast reconstruction surgery wichita plastic surgeon
Dr. Peterson routinely performs breast reconstruction surgeries on a weekly basis and has completed hundreds of successful cases.

Please call our friendly staff at 316-265-1441 so we can discuss your breast reconstruction surgery options in more detail with our Wichita plastic surgeon. We look forward to answering all your questions!

 

Read More About Breast Reconstruction Surgery Below

Content provided below comes from American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery & American Society of Plastic Surgeons

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The first step: Choose a surgeon you can trust[+]

Plastic surgery involves many choices. The first and most important is selecting a surgeon you can trust. A doctor’s board certification is one of the best indicators of his or her training. Ask for certification from The American Board of Plastic Surgery® (ABPS), the only one of the 24 boards approved by the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) that certifies physicians in plastic surgery of the face and all areas of the body. To be ABPS board-certified, a physician must meet these rigorous standards:

  • Graduate from an accredited medical school
  • Complete at least five years of surgical training following medical school with a minimum of two years of plastic surgery residency training
  • Pass comprehensive oral and written exams

 

American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) and American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS) Members must:

  • Be certified by the ABPS or in Canada by The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada®
  • Complete continuing medical education including patient safety each year
  • Perform surgery in accredited, state-licensed or
  • Medicare-certified surgical facilities

Enhancing your appearance with breast reconstruction[+]

Breast reconstruction is a physically and emotionally rewarding procedure for a woman who has lost a breast due to cancer or other condition. The creation of a new breast can dramatically improve your self-image, self-confidence and quality of life. Although surgery can give you a relatively natural-looking breast, a reconstructed breast will never look or feel exactly the same as the breast that was removed.

Is it right for me?

Breast reconstruction is a highly individualized procedure. You should do it for yourself, not to fulfill someone else’s desires or to try to fit any sort of ideal image. Breast reconstruction is a good option for you if:

  • You are able to cope well with your diagnosis and treatment
  • You do not have additional medical condibons or other illnesses that may impair healing
  • You have a positive outlook and realistic goals for restoring your breast and body image

Breast reconstruction typically involves several procedures performed in multiple stages. It can:

  • Begin at the same time as mastectomy, or
  • Be delayed until you heal from mastectomy and recover from any additional cancer treatments

What to expect during your consultation [+]

The success and safety of your breast reconstruction procedure depends very much on your complete candidness during your consultation. You’ll be asked a number of questions about your health. desires and lifestyle.

Be prepared to discuss:

  • Why you want the surgery, your expectations and desired outcome
  • Medical conditions, drug allergies and medical treatments
  • Use of current medications, vitamins, herbal supplements, alcohol, tobacco and drugs
  • Previous surgeries
  • The options available in breast reconstruction surgery
  • The likely outcomes of breast reconstruction and any risks or potential complications
  • The course of treatment recommended by your plastic surgeon, including procedures to achieve breast symmetry

Your surgeon may also:

  • Evaluate your general health status and any pre-existing health conditions or risk factors
  • Examine your breasts, and take detailed measurements of their size and shape, skin quality, and placement of nipples and areola
  • Take photographs for your medical record
  • Discuss your options and recommend a course of treatment
  • Discuss likely outcomes of breast reconstruction and any risks or potential complications

Preparing for surgery[+]

Prior to surgery, you may be asked to:

  • Get lab testing or a medical evaluation
  • Take certain medications or adjust your current medications
  • Stop smoking well in advance of surgery
  • Avoid taking aspirin, anti-inflammatory drugs and herbal supplements as they can increase bleeding

Special instructions you receive will cover:

  • What to do on the day of surgery
  • The use of anesthesia during your breast reconstruction
  • Post-operative care and follow-up
  • Breast implant registry documents (when necessary)

 

What is breast reconstruction?[+]

Breast reconstruction is achieved through several plastic surgery techniques that attempt to restore a breast to near normal shape, appearance and size following mastectomy. Although breast reconstruction can rebuild your breast, the results are highly variable:

  • A reconstructed breast will not have the same sensation and feel as the breast it replaces.
  • Visible incision lines will always be present on the breast, whether from reconstruction or mastectomy.
  • Certain surgical techniques will leave incision lines at the donor site, commonly located in less exposed areas of the body such as the back, abdomen or buttocks.

Lumpectomy reconstruction can help provide a better shape in some cases. If you choose to conserve the breast and have a lumpectomy, you will require radiation. After radiation, the breast may be misshapen in the area where breast tissue was removed. In some cases, especially when the lumpectomy will be in the central or lower parts of the breast, a better cosmetic result can be achieved by rearranging the breast tissue at the time of lumpectomy surgery. However, if the tumor is not able to be completely excised and the breast tissue has been rearranged, you will then require a mastectomy.

A note about symmetry: If only one breast is affected it alone may be reconstructed In addition a breast lift, breast reduction or breast augmentation may be recommended for the opposite breast to improve symmetry of the size and position of both breasts.

Important facts about the safety and risks of breast reconstruction[+]

The decision to have breast reconstruction surgery is extremely personal. You’ll have to decide if the benefits will achieve your goals and if the risks and potential complications are acceptable. Your plastic surgeon and/or staff will explain in detail the risks associated with surgery. You will be asked to sign consent forms to ensure that you fully understand the procedures you will undergo and any risks or potential complications.

The possible risks of breast reconstruction include, but are not limited to, bleeding, infection, poor healing of incisions, and anesthesia risks. You should also know that:

  • Flap surgery includes the risk of partial or complete loss of the flap and a loss of sensation at both the donor and reconstruction site.
  • The use of implants carries the risk of breast firmness (capsular contracture) and implant rupture.

Where will my surgery be performed?
Surgery for your breast reconstruction is most often performed in a hospital setting, possibly including a short hospital stay, and your doctor will likely use general anesthesia. Some follow-up procedures may be performed on an outpatient basis, and local anesthesia with sedation may be used.

These decisions will be based on the requirements of your specific procedure and in consideration of your preferences and your doctor’s best judgment.

What happens during breast reconstruction surgery?[+]

Step 1 – Anesthesia

Medications are administered for your comfort during the surgical procedure. The choices include intravenous sedation and general anesthesia. Your doctor will recommend the best choice for you.

Step 2 – Flap techniques reposition a woman’s own muscle, fat and skin to create or cover the breast mound.

Sometimes a mastectomy or radiation therapy will leave insufficient tissue on the chest wall to cover and support a breast implant. The use of a breast implant for reconstruction almost always requires either a flap technique or tissue expansion.

A TRAM flap uses donor muscle, fat and skin from a woman’s abdomen to reconstruct the breast. The flap may either remain attached to the original blood supply and be tunneled up through the chest wall, or be completely detached, and formed into a breast mound. Alternatively, your surgeon may choose the DIEP or SGAP flap techniques which do not use muscle but transport tissue to the chest from the abdomen or buttock.

stacy-peterson-md-breast-reconstruction-tram-flap

A latissimus dorsi flap uses muscle, fat and skin from the back tunneled to the mastectomy site and remains attached to its donor site, leaving blood supply intact.

stacy-peterson-md-breast-reconstruction-latissimus-dorsi-flap

Occasionally, the flap can reconstruct a complete breast mound, but often provides the muscle and tissue necessary to cover and support a breast implant.

stacy-peterson-md-breast-reconstruction-latissimus-dorsi-flap-support

Step 3 – Tissue expansion stretches healthy skin to provide coverage for a breast implant.

Reconstruction with tissue expansion allows an easier recovery than flap procedures, but it is a more lengthy reconstruction process. It requires many office visits over 4-6 months after placement of the expander to slowly fill the device through an internal valve to expand the skin. A second surgical procedure will be needed to replace the expander if it is not designed to serve as a permanent implant.

Step 4 – Surgical placement of a breast implant creates a breast mound.

A breast implant can be an addition or alternative to flap techniques. Saline and silicone implants are available for reconstruction. Your surgeon will help you decide what is best for you. Reconstruction with an implant alone usually requires tissue expansion.

stacy-peterson-md-breast-reconstruction-placement

Step 5 – Grafting and other specialized techniques create a nipple and areola.

Breast reconstruction is completed through a variety of techniques that reconstruct the nipple and areola.

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My recovery[+]

Following your surgery for flap techniques and/or the insertion of an implant, gauze or bandages will be applied to your incision. An elastic bandage or support bra will minimize swelling and support the reconstructed breast. A small, thin tube may be temporarily placed under the skin to drain any excess blood or fluid. A pain pump may also be used to reduce the need for narcotics.

Be sure to ask your plastic surgeon specific questions about what you can expect during your individual recovery period.

  • Where will I be taken after my surgery is complete?
  • What medication will I be given or prescribed after surgery?
  • Will I have dressings/bandages after surgery?
  • When will they be removed?
  • Are stitches removed? When?
  • When can I resume normal activity and exercise?
  • When do I return for follow-up care?

Healing will continue for several weeks as welling decreases and breast shape and position improve. Continue to follow your plastic surgeon’s instructions and attend follow-up visits as scheduled.

Results and outlook
The final results of breast reconstruction following mastectomy can help lessen the physical and emotional impact of mastectomy.

Over time, some breast sensation may return, and scar lines will improve, although they’ll never disappear completely. There are trade-offs, but most women feel these are small compared to the large improvement in the quality of life and the ability to look and feel whole. Careful monitoring of breast health through self-exam, mammography and other diagnostic techniques is essential to your long-term health.

When you go home
If you experience shortness of breath, chest pains, or unusual heart beats, seek medical attention immediately. Should any of these complications occur, you may require hospitalization and additional treatment.

The practice of medicine and surgery is not an exact science. Although good results are expected, there is no guarantee. In some situations, it may not be possible to achieve optimal results with a single surgical procedure. Another surgery may be necessary.

Be careful
Following your physician’s instructions is key to the success of your surgery. It is important that the surgical incisions are not subjected to excessive force, abrasion, or motion during the time of healing. Avoid wearing any clothing that must go over your head. Your doctor will give you specific instructions on how to care for yourself.

Words to know[+]

Areola: Pigmented skin surrounding the nipple.

Breast augmentation: Breast enlargement by surgery.

Breast lift: Also known as mastopexy; surgery to lift the breasts.

Breast reduction: Reduction of breast size and breast lift by surgery.

Capsular contracture: A complication of breast implant surgery which occurs when scar tissue that normally forms around the implant tightens and squeezes the implant and becomes firm.

DIEP flap: Deep Inferior Epigastric Perforator flap which takes tissue from the abdomen.

Donor site: An area of your body where the surgeon harvests skin, muscle and fat to reconstruct your breast.

Flap techniques: Surgical techniques used to reposition your own skin, muscle and fat to reconstruct or cover your breast.

Free TRAM flap: A version of the TRAM flap based on the deep inferior epigastric artery but not including all of the rectus abdominis muscle saving abdominal integrity.

General anesthesia: Drugs and/or gases used during an operation to relieve pain and alter consciousness.

Grafting: A surgical technique to recreate your nipple and areola.

Hematoma: Blood pooling beneath the skin.

Intravenous sedation: Sedatives administered by injection into a vein to help you relax.

Latissimus dorsi flap technique: A surgical technique that uses muscle, fat and skin tunneled under the skin and tissue of a woman’s back to the reconstructed breast and remains attached to its donor site, leaving blood supply intact.

Local anesthesia: A drug injected directly to the site of an incision during an operation to relieve pain.

Mastectomy: The removal of the whole breast, typically to rid the body of cancer.

SGAP flap: Superior Gluteal Artery perforator flap which takes tissue from the buttock.

Tissue expansion: A surgical technique to stretch your own healthy tissue and create new skin to provide coverage for a breast implant.

TRAM flap: Also known as transverse rectus abdominus musculocutaneous flap, a surgical technique that uses muscle, fat and skin from your own abdomen to reconstruct the breast.

Transaxillary incision: An incision made in the underarm area.

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